Kentucky USDA Rural Housing Loans Credit Requirements for a Loan in 2014

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Credit Scores:

If you have a credit score below 640 you will probably get referred for a manual underwrite which means the income and credit requirements are much tougher for scores below 640. We can do scores down to 620 but usually it is best to try and raise your score to 640 so we can get an automated approval thru GUS.

If GUS returns an refer/eligible, then we can consider doing a manul underwrite on your loan approval. This usually entails a verifiable rent history over the last 12 months with no lates, and the debt to income ratios are usually tied to the industry old standard of 29% and 41% respectively.

If GUS returns an ineligible status, then your loan is automatically denied and there is no chance of getting approved when this result shows.

Collections:

If you have any delinquent back taxes, student loans they would need to be paid or brought current so you don’t have any liens to the government.

Delinquent Government Debt (back taxes, student loans

Medical bills are usually okay if they are not showing as a garnishment against you or on the title search.

Large unpaid utility bills, credit card charge offs, and car repos will usually have to be paid before closing. You will have to show you have funds to pay these off before closing.

Foreclosure:

You have to be 3 years removed from a foreclosure to qualify for a Kentucky RHS loan.

Bankruptcy:

  • Chapter 7 Bankruptices require a 3 year wait after the bankruptcy was discharged.
  • Chapter 13 bankruptices only require 1 year wait after discharge. 
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Joel Lobb
Senior  Loan Officer

(NMLS#57916)
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
800 Stone Creek Pkwy, Ste 7,
Louisville, KY 40223
 Fax:     (502) 327-9119
 
 Company ID #1364 | MB73346

Kentucky USDA Loans | Rural Housing Loans Kentucky

Kentucky USDA Loans | Rural Housing Loans Kentucky.

via Kentucky USDA Loans | Rural Housing Loans Kentucky.

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Can I get an USDA Mortgage Loan after bankruptcy?

Criteria for USDA loan approvals state that if you have been discharged from a Chapter 7 bankruptcy for three years or more, you are eligible to apply for an USDA mortgage. If you are in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy and have made all court approved payments on time and as agreed for at least one year, you are also eligible to make an Kentucky USDA loan application.

Joel Lobb
Senior  Loan Officer

(NMLS#57916)
 
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
800 Stone Creek Pkwy, Ste 7,
Louisville, KY 40223
 Fax:     (502) 327-9119
 
 Company ID #1364 | MB73346

USDA Rural Housing Map for Ineligible Cities in Kentucky for Housing Loans.  Areas including are Louisville,  Lexington, Paducah, Richmond, Hopkinsville, Owensboro, and Bowling Green KY

Eligible Cities are Back!A Continuing Resolution has passed allowing RHS to refer back to the 2000 census data for eligible areas.  This will allow the following eight Kentucky cities to remain eligible until January 2014:  Bardstown, Burlington, Elizabethtown, Georgetown, Independence, Nicholasville, Shelbyville, and Shepherdsville.  This is good news as implementation of the 2010 census data has been put on hold again

click on image to enlarge the area for more detailed map

 

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The United States Department of Agriculture has created a special home buyer opportunity for Americans that live in rural areas. These home buying programs were designed to increase homeownership amongst lower and middle income families that live in smaller sized cities, towns, and remote areas.

What makes these loans so special?

  • No Down Payments – USDA loans are one of the only home mortgages that allow someone to buy a home without putting any money down. In fact, the only other way someone can finance 100% of their home purchase is if they are in the military or a veteran. Even someone with perfect credit, long job history, and plenty of savings/assets can not qualify for 0 down on a home loan. This is a unique and very special aspect of USDA home buyer loans.
  • Lower PMI costs– Private Mortgage Insurance, also known as “PMI” is much lower on USDA loans than FHA or conventional mortgages. This can save you a lot of money.
  • Reduced Interest Rates The interest rates are lower on USDA loans, which results in lower payments, and plenty of money saved overtime.

Would You Like to Get Prequalified or Apply For a USDA Loan Now?
Click Here to Get Pre-Approved for a USDA Loan

How to Qualify for a USDA Loan

The best way to find out if you qualify for a USDA loan is to speak with one of our USDA specialists. It is easy to find out if you are eligible and usually only takes a few minutes. There are some basic qualification guidelines that the Department of Agriculture has set up which will help you have an idea if you can get a USDA loan.

  • Property Eligibility – The home you want to finance with a USDA loan must be an eligible property. You can not buy any home you want, it must be a designated property. You can look up homes in certain areas, or you can search by address on the USDA website.
  • Job History – Similar to all other mortgage loans, a two year work history is required.  You must show that you have been consistently employed for the past two years straight in order to qualify for USDA financing.
  • Income Limits – You must not make over a certain amount in order to receive a USDA mortgage. This amount varies by location so you will need to look up your specific counties income limits.
  • DTI Ratio– One of the main ways which determines if you will be approved or not is your debt-to-income ratios. While you must not make too much money, you also must not have too much debt. Your debt-to-income ratio is how much monthly debt you have (only those debts which show on your credit report are counted) compared to your bring home income. So if your household income is $4,000/month, and your currently monthly debts (excluding rent), combined with your new mortgage payment are $1,500/month, this would equal a 37.5% DTI ratios (this was calculated by taking $1,500 and dividing it by $4,000).
  • Credit Score – The minimum credit score varies from lender to lender, but most want to see at least a 640 credit score for you to be approved.
  • Mortgage Insurance – USDA loans have their own version of mortgage insurance. It is called the “Guaranteed Fee” and works similarly to how FHA loans have upfront and monthly mortgage insurance premiums (MIP). With USDA loans, there is a 1.0% upfront guarantee fee, and a 0.350% annual guarantee fee that is divided into 12 payments each year. The amount of your annual fee (paid monthly) adjusts each and goes down as your loan balance does. Use our USDA calculator to get an idea of what your monthly payment will be:

What Are the USDA Programs That Exist?

The USDA has two primary loan programs that exist. This includes direct loans and guaranteed loans.

  • Direct Loan – These are loans made directly by the government. You do not have to go through a mortgage lender, but instead you apply with the Department of Agriculture.  The direct loan is named the USDA 502 Direct Loan.
  • Guaranteed Loans – Guaranteed loans are those processed and closed by a USDA mortgage lender.  This program is called the USDA 502 Guaranteed Loan. The USDA backs the loan, but does not issue the loan themselves.

The difference between these two, aside from who provides the financing, is eligibility requirements.  The USDA 502 direct loan is geared more towards lower income families that may have issue obtaining a loan from a mortgage lender.  The USDA 502 guaranteed loan allows for more borrowers, including those with more income, to get a USDA loan.  Some applicants may be able to get a direct or guaranteed loan.  When you speak with a mortgage representative, they will help you identify which programs are available to you.  You can then compare loan terms of any mortgage you qualify for.

How to Apply for a USDA Loan

It is very easy to apply for a USDA loan. In fact, we can prequalify you over the phone. The best way to apply is to request a free USDA loan consultation and a loan specialist will contact you. All we need for an initial pre qualification is for you to share some basic information and we can inform you of your eligibility.

Would You Like to Get Prequalified or Apply For a USDA Loan Now?

USDA Mortgage Questions and Answers

Are USDA loans only for farms and agricultural properties?
This is a very common question and something that many people wonder about since it is the Department of Agriculture that backs these loans. It is actually the complete opposite though. USDA loans are meant for residential homes in rural areas, not agricultural or farmland.

Can you buy a farm with a USDA?
USDA loans are strictly for residential properties, so no farm or land that is used for agricultural purposes are allowed. In simplest words, the property can not be income producing.

If USDA loans are for rural properties does that mean they are not available near cities?
Surprisingly this is not the case either. Another misconception about the USDA home buying program is that the loans are exclusively for homes in remote areas. There are actually plenty of eligible homes just outside of various urban/suburban areas. The best way for you to get an idea of what type of home you can buy, and where, is to use the USDA property eligibility search.

Can I buy an investment property with a USDA loan?
No, you may only use a USDA loan for a home that you personally occupy as the owner.

Can I finance the loan costs into the loan?
Yes, you can finance the closing costs and the upfront mortgage insurance into the loan. This means that you do not pay the fees out of pocket at closing, but instead it is added to the loan amount. It is important to note that you will then be paying interest on these fees if they are wrapped into the mortgage. Just some “food for thought” when you decide if that is something you want to do.

How much is mortgage insurance on USDA loans?
There are two types of mortgage insurance on USDA loans. This includes both upfront mortgage insurance and what is called the “annual fee”. The upfront amount is 1.00% of the loan amount. This can be added to the loan amount (as described in the question above). The “annual fee” is divided into your monthly payments. This fee is 0.35% of the loan balance (recalculated each year). So the amount goes down as you pay your mortgage. The annual fee of 0.35% is divided into 12 and added to the monthly payments. This is cheaper than FHA MIP (mortgage insurance premiums), as well as the PMI amounts on VA and conventional loans.

Do I have to be a first time home buyer?
The good news is you do not have to be a first time buyer. The only stipulation is that it must be your primary residence. So you must not currently own a home to be able to get a USDA loan.

What is the loan limits? How much can I borrow?
USDA loan limits adhere to the Fannie Mae / Freddie Mac conforming loan limits. For a single family residence, this amount is $417,000 in most areas of the county


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Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior  Loan Officer
 
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223
Company ID #1364 | MB73346
 


Text/call 502-905-3708
kentuckyloan@gmail.com

http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
Disclaimer: No statement on this site is a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower qualifications, including income, property evaluation, sufficient equity in the home to meet Loan-to-Value requirements, and final credit approval. Approvals are subject to underwriting guidelines, interest rates, and program guidelines and are subject to change without notice based on applicant’s eligibility and market conditions. Refinancing an existing loan may result in total finance charges being higher over the life of a loan. Reduction in payments may reflect a longer loan term. Terms of any loan may be subject to payment of points and fees by the applicant  Equal Opportunity Lender. NMLS#57916 http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
 
— Some products and services may not be available in all states. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lend. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. The content in this marketing advertisement has not been approved, reviewed, sponsored or endorsed by any department or government agency. Rates are subject to change and are subject to borrower(s) qualification.
 
 

 

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I specialize in Kentucky FHA, VA, USDA, KHC, Jumbo and Fannie Mae mortgage loans in Ky. I have helped over 589 Kentucky families buy their first home and refinance their current mortgage for a lower rate; For the first time buyer with little money, Kentucky Housing/KHC offers(zero-down)loans with down payment assistance. Free credit/pre-approvals in 1 hour Call me today at 502-905-3708 or email kentuckyloan@gmail.com I compare Kentucky Mortgage Rates daily for your best interest(NMLS# 57916)

Understanding and Improving Your Credit Scores

Understanding and Improving Your Credit Scores.

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What is a Good Credit Score to qualify for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan for USDA, RHS, VA, FHA, and Fannie Mae

What is a Good Credit Score to qualify for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan for USDA, RHS, VA, FHA, and Fannie Mae

What is a Good Credit Score.

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What is a Good Credit Score to qualify for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan for USDA, RHS, VA, FHA, and Fannie Mae

 

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What is a Good Credit Score?

An established credit history and credit score often stands between potential home or car buyers and their dream. But What is a good credit score? What exactly is a credit score? What makes a credit score “good?” How to improve your credit score? If you’re new to building credit there are a few things you need to know in order to keep your credit looking stellar.
What is a credit score?
Your credit score is a numerical representation of your credit report. This three-digit number is like a badge that predicts risk, credit responsibility and determines your interest rates if you borrow money from lenders much like your CLUE Report. While you will be able to get a copy of your credit report you may not find this numerical key listed. Think of your credit score like the cliff notes version of your credit report. There are a few different measures of credit scores between divisions. Based on their own systems different scorers might view certain numbers in many ways.

what is a good credit score

what is a good credit score
Deciphering your three-digit credit score is quite easy if you know the levels. The range usually runs from 300-850. Good to excellent credit is considered anything from 700 to 850. If your credit score falls in this range you’re going great! Fair credit runs from 625-699, poor runs from 550-624, and anything below 550 is bad. Some finance experts would classify anything over 720 a good credit rating. Experts will disagree depending on their preferred credit rating systems, and in most cases the criteria you use to determine whether or not your credit score is good will not be far off.
What Does a Good Credit Score Mean?
Having a good credit score is great, but if you don’t know how to use it you could be missing out on some crucial credit building. Credit scores are used in varying ways by lenders and banks. One thing your credit score implies is how likely you are to pay back debt. Basically it announces how reliable you are as a borrower. People with good credit scores are more likely to pay back funds that they borrow while those with lower scores aren’t so reliable. Lenders like reliable borrowers, and good credit points them out.
But a credit score does much more than predict whether or not you’ll pay a loan back. When it comes to buying a house or car, there is an interest charge. Higher credit scores usually have a lower interest rate than those with bad to fair credit. Lenders not only base whether or not they’ll approve a loan by your credit score, but also how much interest to charge. If your credit is in good standing your interest rate won’t be as high as someone with bad credit. Your credit score saves you money with lower interest rates.
How is a Credit Score Calculated?
In order to build and maintain good credit you must first know how your score is determined. Once you know what goes into a credit score you can begin building your credit or nursing your score towards higher digits. Credit scores are based on your financial history only, and laws prevent your score being affected by things like race, gender, age and where you live. What is included are items such as your payment history, your current credit debts, age of your credit history, new credit items added to your accounts and types of credit used.
These five basic areas are where the bulk of your credit score is formed. All criteria have varying degrees of involvement in your score. For example:
  • Payment history (35%) – How many on-time payments you’ve made, missed, defaulted and past due items
  • Current amount owed (30%) – How much you currently owe – if you owe a large amount this could negatively affect your score
  • Age of credit history (15%) – The average length of your credit accounts and time since last activity
  • New credit (10%) – The number of new credit items on your accounts
  • Types of credit (10%) – The kinds of credit accounts are you currently maintain
How to Improve Your Credit Score?
Many people avoid credit based on all the negatives they’ve heard against it, but neglecting your credit score hurts your chances of being able to make major purchases in the future. The best way to build credit is to use credit, and forming the following good credit habits early will pull your low score to higher ground.
  • Pay bills on time – This is the easiest and best way to boost your credit score. Since the bulk of your credit score comes from your payment history, paying bills on time will pull you up quickly. Not only will that help, but a recent and consistent history of paying bills on time overshadow a period long in the past where you may have missed payments.
  • Budget – Setting up a budget and staying within its parameters will keep you from overspending and using credit for frivolous things. Although using credit builds credit not being able to pay it off hurts more in the future.
  • Use all your credit cards regularly – If you have a few credit cards try to use them from time to time in order to show that you use all of your accounts. Remember that the last usage of an account is 15% of your score.
If you want to start repairing a bad credit history or start building yours, find out what your credit score is. I use Credit Karma to check mine, you can check out my review of Credit Karma or if want just apply here –www.creditkarma.com.
Making your way to a good credit score and keeping your score high won’t be a financial nightmare when you know how to build it and what it means financially.


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Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior  Loan Officer

4 Ways You Might Be Hurting Your Credit Score (And What You Can Do About It)

Factors contributing to someone's credit score...
Factors contributing to someone’s credit score, for Credit score (United States). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

4 Ways You Might Be Hurting Your Credit Score (And What You Can Do About It).

Kentucky FHA, VA, KHC, Rural Housing and Fannie Mae Loan Free Pre-Approvals for Mortgage Loans

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