Tag: USDA Loan

KY USDA Up-Front Guarantee Fee Increase Effective October 1st, 2015

2015 Kentucky Rural Housing USDA Changes

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KY USDA Up-Front Guarantee Fee Increase Effective October 1st, 2015

Any Kentucky RHS USDA loan that has not received conditional commitment from state Rural Development Offices in Lexington, KY by end of business on 9/30 will be subject to the 2.75% up-front guarantee fee increase.

Loan Purpose Loans obligated at RD on and after 10/01/2014 Loans obligated at RD on and after10/01/2015
Purchase Up-Front Guarantee Fee 2.0% 2.75%
Refinance Up-Front Guarantee Fee 2.0% 2.75%
First time home buyer loan in Louisville Kentucky
First time home buyer loan in Kentucky
Joel Lobb
Senior  Loan Officer
(NMLS#57916)
 
 Fax:     (502) 327-9119
 
 

 CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This message is covered by the Electronic

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Kentucky USDA Guaranteed Rural Housing Loans

Kentucky USDA Guaranteed Rural Housing LoansDid you know that Kentucky home buyers can still get a mortgage with no money down, even with less than perfect credit? The Kentucky Guaranteed Rural Housing Loan Program offers these options in a wide range of areas, including many suburbs outside the major metro areas of Louisville, Lexington, Bowling Green, Owensboro, Paducah, Hopkinsville, and Northern Kentucky cities of Florence, Covington and Newport.This loan program is offered through the Kentucky Rural Housing Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and designed to assist low and moderate-income residents by providing better access to affordable housing finance options including little or no out-of-pocket costs in eligible areas.

  • To see if your market area falls in a designated Rural area, visit:http://eligibility.sc.egov.usda.gov/eligibility/welcomeAction.do
  • Available to low- and moderate-income borrowers whose adjusted income is equal to or less than 115% of the area median income
  • Owner-occupied single family non-farm residences, approved condos and PUDs
  • New construction properties are eligible
  • Home buyers can finance up to 100% of the market appraised value, including all recurring and non-recurring closing costs, in some circumstances Loan amounts as high as $417,000 in the continental U.S. Higher in Alaska and Hawaii.
  • No foreclosures in last 3 years. Can be a previous homeowner
  • No bankruptcies in last 3 years for A chapter 7. Chapter 13 are usually okay with 12 months history.
  • Credit scores as low as 620 No asset or reserve requirements. Gift funds are allowed

 
Joel Lobb
Senior  Loan Officer

(NMLS#57916)
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
800 Stone Creek Pkwy, Ste 7,
Louisville, KY 40223
 Fax:     (502) 327-9119
 
 Company ID #1364 | MB73346

Kentucky USDA Rural Housing Loans Credit Requirements for a Loan in 2014

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Credit Scores:

If you have a credit score below 640 you will probably get referred for a manual underwrite which means the income and credit requirements are much tougher for scores below 640. We can do scores down to 620 but usually it is best to try and raise your score to 640 so we can get an automated approval thru GUS.

If GUS returns an refer/eligible, then we can consider doing a manul underwrite on your loan approval. This usually entails a verifiable rent history over the last 12 months with no lates, and the debt to income ratios are usually tied to the industry old standard of 29% and 41% respectively.

If GUS returns an ineligible status, then your loan is automatically denied and there is no chance of getting approved when this result shows.

Collections:

If you have any delinquent back taxes, student loans they would need to be paid or brought current so you don’t have any liens to the government.

Delinquent Government Debt (back taxes, student loans

Medical bills are usually okay if they are not showing as a garnishment against you or on the title search.

Large unpaid utility bills, credit card charge offs, and car repos will usually have to be paid before closing. You will have to show you have funds to pay these off before closing.

Foreclosure:

You have to be 3 years removed from a foreclosure to qualify for a Kentucky RHS loan.

Bankruptcy:

  • Chapter 7 Bankruptices require a 3 year wait after the bankruptcy was discharged.
  • Chapter 13 bankruptices only require 1 year wait after discharge. 
52798-academy-mortgage-apply-now
Joel Lobb
Senior  Loan Officer

(NMLS#57916)
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
800 Stone Creek Pkwy, Ste 7,
Louisville, KY 40223
 Fax:     (502) 327-9119
 
 Company ID #1364 | MB73346

KENTUCKY RURAL HOUSING CHANGES TO ANNUAL USDA GUARANTEE FEE STRUCTURE

KENTUCKY RURAL HOUSING CHANGES TO ANNUAL USDA GUARANTEE FEE STRUCTURE

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ANNUAL GUARANTEE FEE
THROUGH 9/30/2014
EFFECTIVE 10/1/14
Purchase Transactions

.40%

.50%

Refinance Transactions

.40%

.50%

The new fee structure is applicable to all Conditional Commitments issued by Kentucky Rural Development Loans  on or after October 1, 2014.

Loan guarantee requests submitted to Rural Development (RD) on which a conditional commitment has not been issued by September 30, 2014, will be subject to the 2014 annual guarantee fee structure.

There is no exception to the new annual guarantee fee structure regardless of the date the file was submitted/received by RD . Inc. If the Conditional Commitment has not been issued before October 1, 2014, the file will need to be revised to reflect the correct fees and this will require re-disclosure, re-underwriting and resubmission to RD.

The Guarantee Fee change will take effect 10/1/2014.

 
Joel Lobb
Senior  Loan Officer

(NMLS#57916)
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
800 Stone Creek Pkwy, Ste 7,
Louisville, KY 40223
 Fax:     (502) 327-9119
 
 Company ID #1364 | MB73346

 CONFIDENTI

Income Requirements for A Kentucky Rural Housing Loan Approval.

KENTUCKY USDA-MORTGAGE-LOAN-CALCULATOR-FREE-USDALoansDirect

Income Eligibility:

Income from all occupants of the household must be included as qualifying income regardless of whether or not they are obligated on the note. Income eligibility can be determined from the following USDA web site. Final eligibility must still be determined by USDA

When a borrower has a rental property it must also be included in the eligibility calculation.

  • Positive net rental income is included in the eligibility income for the household
  • Negative net rental income is counted as zero for eligibility income

Qualifying Income:

The underwriter is responsible for calculating income and approving the loan. Applicants with commission only position’s, or varying amounts of overtime and bonus income may not exhibit enough stable monthly income to qualify. Typically, income of less than 24 months duration should not be included in qualifying income.

  • Salaried Borrowers
    • Pay-stubs covering most recent 30 day period, W-2’s for the previous two years and telephone verification of employment performed by Freedom Mortgage (paystub must show at least 30 days of year-to-date earnings).
    • If overtime, commission, or bonus income is used for qualifying purposes the file must be documented with a two year history of receipt and be expected to continue.
    • Standard VOE, sent directly to the employer, along with the borrower’s most recent paystub.
  • Self-Employed Borrowers
    • Copies of the borrower’s signed individual Federal tax returns that were filed with the IRS for the most recent two years. As an alternative, the Freedom may obtain IRS-issued transcripts of the borrower’s tax returns, as long as the transcripts include the information from all of the applicable schedules. The tax return documentation should be complete and include all appropriate schedules.
    • The self-employed applicant also should submit current documentation of the business’s income and expenses, including any applicable Federal tax returns that were filed with the IRS for the most recent two years as well as year-to-date profit and loss and balance statements.
  • Rental Income
    • Rental income may only be counted for repayment income if the lease has been in place for at least two years. For leases older than two years, count positive net rental income in repayment income and negative net rental income as debt. If rental income is not received for a full two year period then the full PITIA must be used in the debt to income calculation.
    • Rental income calculation – reduce monthly gross income by a 25% vacancy rate, and then the monthly PITI, HOA dues, etc. are subtracted. If positive then include in income if negative include in DTI.

All other income sources refer to USDA guidelines for all income guidelines and documentation requirements

Assets:

  • Assets are not required; however, any assets disclosed must be supported with appropriate documentation
  • Satisfactory explanation and documentation should be provided for large deposits or increases in liquid assets
  • Cash on hand is not acceptable
  • Bank accounts require Verification of Deposit with average 2 month balance, or 2 consecutive months statements dated within 45 days of loan application
  • Earnest money deposit may be considered an asset if deposit is not already reflected in liquid assets
  • Asset amount of retirement accounts is 60% of the vested account balance
  • Gifts must be documented through gift donor letter and establish that gift does not have to be repaid
  • For sale proceeds of real property, provide HUD-1 or equivalent closing statement to indicate the actual amount of cash proceeds realized by the borrower
  • Stocks and bonds must be documented by a statement provide by stockbroker or financial institution managing the portfolio
  • Households with net family assets of greater than $5,000 require that the actual income derived from all net family assets or a percentage of the value of such assets based on the current passbook savings rate be considered when calculating income.

 

 

How to Close on Time – Assets Bank Statement Basics for A Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval for USDA, KHC, FHA, VA, Fannie Mae and Rural Housing Mortgage Loans!

How to Close on Time – Assets.

via How to Close on Time – Assets.

 by Louisville Kentucky Mortgage

Bank Statement Basics for A Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval for USDA, KHC, FHA, VA, Fannie Mae and Rural Housing Mortgage Loans!

Kentucky Rural Development and Rural Housing USDA Loan Program

Kentucky Rural Development and Rural Housing USDA Loan Program

    1. General Information

The Rural Housing Service (RHS) provides a number of housing and community facility programs in rural areas. The direct rural housing programs provide subsidy for home ownership, rental housing, home repairs, and rehabilitation. Only one of 16 direct programs is not subsidized. RHS also has two unsubsidized loan guarantee programs. All RHS housing, except Section 514/516 Farm Labor Housing, must be located in rural areas as defined in this guide. The programs are carried out by the Department of Agriculture’s Rural Development staff through a network of local, area, and state offices. Offices can be located through Rural Development’s website.

RHS’s funding priorities have gradually shifted from a focus on making direct loans to an emphasis on guaranteeing loans made by private lenders and/or partnering with states and the private sector to make leveraged loans. This change is intended to extend limited federal appropriations.

Most applications for the direct single-family housing programs are received, processed, and approved by Rural Development employees, primarily in local offices (previously known as county offices). Local office staff also provide counseling, supervision, and site inspection, in addition to assisting with multifamily applications. Loan servicing is now centralized at an office in St. Louis, Mo. Applications for multifamily assistance are processed in the area or state offices depending on the structure approved in each state. Rural Development staff also serve as field staff for the two other Rural Development agencies – the Rural Utilities Service and the Rural Business-Cooperative Service.

Program instructions and applicable forms are available at the Rural Development website at http://rdinit.usda.gov/regs or at Rural Development offices.

It is useful to understand the following general information before discussing RHS housing programs.

      1. Definitions
        1. Rural Areas. With the exception of its farm labor housing program (Sections 514/516), which is also available in urban areas, RHS/Rural Development makes housing loans and grants only in rural areas. Each Rural Development local office maintains a map delineating eligible rural areas. Different definitions of “rural” apply to USDA’s community facility (e.g., water and waste disposal) and business loan programs. These programs are discussed in later sections of this guide. For all housing programs, RHS defines rural as: 1) open country that is not part of or associated with an urban area, or 2) any town, village, city, or place, including the immediately adjacent densely settled area, that:
          • has a population not in excess of 2,500 and is not part of or associated with an urban area;
          • has a population under 10,000 and is rural in character;
          • has a population under 20,000, is outside a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), and has a serious lack of mortgage credit for low-income families, as agreed to by the Secretaries of Agriculture and Housing and Urban Development (Rural Development district or local offices provide a listing of eligible areas with populations under 20,000); or
          • was determined to be rural prior to October 1, 1990 and whose population after the 1990 decennial Census did not exceed 25,000 (this provision may be changed – either to update it when data from the 2000 Census become available or, as proposed in Congress in 2000, to maintain eligibility based on the 1980 Census through 2010).
          • Specifically accepted as rural are Pajero, Calif.; Guadalupe, Ariz.; Plainsview, Texas; and Altus, Okla.
        2. Income Limits. Very low-, low-, and moderate-income families or individuals may be eligible for RHS housing. Funding for new loans is currently limited to very low- and low-income applicants, with the exception of Section 502 guaranteed loans and Section 515 rental projects, for which moderate-income households are also eligible. A family’s adjusted income determines both its eligibility for RHS housing assistance and the level of assistance provided. RHS uses HUD’s determinations of low and very low income levels, which are established by county or by Metropolitan Statistical Area. RHS has a unique definition of moderate income, however; generally moderate income is $5,500 over the area’s low-income ceiling. Income limits are available at http://www.huduser.org/datasets/il.html or from Rural Development offices.
        3. “Credit Elsewhere” Conditions. In general, an applicant for an RHS housing loan must be unable to obtain credit elsewhere on reasonable terms and conditions. The restriction does not apply, however, to public housing agencies or to any other public body applicant. This requirement is clearest in the case of home mortgage borrowers. The “credit elsewhere” criterion for Section 515 rental project loans refers to the project sponsor’s ability to obtain credit enabling it to provide housing with rents affordable to eligible households.
        4. Housing Types and Costs. Housing or public facilities built under RHS programs must be modest and must meet the minimum standards for the voluntary national model building codes adopted in each state, as well as RHS thermal and site standards. The housing may be located on scattered sites or in a subdivision.

         

      2. Programs for Persons with DisabilitiesTitle V of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1977 and the Americans with Disabilities Act extended the use of RHS programs for elderly people to include persons with disabilities. Regulations for each program specify the benefits for which persons with disabilities are eligible. Provisions of the 1988 Fair Housing Act apply.
      1. DemonstrationsRHS/Rural Development will consider applications to demonstrate housing design, systems, financing mechanisms, etc. that do not conform to agency regulations but do adhere to the law. Demonstrations are authorized through the RHS National Office. Administrative Notices describing how to apply for demonstration funding are usually published each fiscal year.
      1. Housing LocationRHS has rules covering housing location. The primary regulation is Instruction 1924-C, which contains a site approval process. The agency environmental regulations (Instruction 1940-G) and specific program instructions also regulate housing location within eligible rural areas.
      1. AppealsMost adverse decisions may be appealed administratively. USDA has a separate appeal staff that conducts hearings and has the authority to overturn decisions. The appeal staff central office may also review decisions made by hearing officers. The covering regulations are presently in 7 CFR Part 11 and Instruction 1900-B. A separate grievance and appeal procedure (Instruction 1944-L) is maintained for tenants in RHS-financed rental housing, including that for farmworkers. Decisions made in connection with Section 502 guaranteed loans are essentially not appealable.
      1. AuthorizationThe RHS housing programs are authorized in Title V of the Housing Act of 1949, as amended. The number cited for each program (502, 504, etc.) refers to the section in Title V.
      1. Targeted AreasRHS annually sets aside a percentage of Section 502 direct, 504 loan and grant, 515, and Rental Assistance funds for areas targeted due to the extent of poverty and deficient housing. These implement the specific percentage set-aside of funds to counties required in Section 509(f) of the law. Specific set-aside information can be found in annual exhibits to Instruction 1940-L. A packaging grant program is operated as a capacity building component of Section 509(f) and is available to 300 counties whose occupied substandard housing is 10 percent or higher and whose poverty rate is 20 percent or more.
    1. HAC ManualsHAC has developed and maintains manuals to assist in understanding and using the RHS rural housing programs. These publications are periodically updated as regulations are amended and include:

      Section 502 Homeownership Direct Loans
      Section 504 Very Low-Income Repair Loans and Grants
      Section 514/516 Farm Labor Housing Program
      Section 515 Rural Rental Housing
      Section 515 Rural Cooperative Housing
      Section 533 Rural Housing Preservation Grants
      Section 538 Guaranteed Rural Rental Housing
      Environmental Regulations
      Appealing RHS/Rural Development Decisions
      Preventing Displacement in RHS/Rural Development Rural Rental Housing

      Where links appear in this list, the guides are available free on HAC’s website. Print copies of any of the guides may be ordered, for the cost of copying and postage, from HAC’s Washington, D.C. office.

  1. Homeownership Direct Loan Program (Section 502 Direct) (CFDA 10.410)The Section 502 program has two major parts: direct loans and guaranteed loans. The two share a single CFDA number, but are described separately here.
      1. PurposeSection 502 direct mortgage loans enable low- and very low-income households to purchase, build, repair, renovate, or relocate houses, including manufactured homes. These loans are also used to purchase and prepare sites and/or to provide water supplies and sewage disposal for sites. Section 502 loans may be used to refinance debts when necessary to avoid losing a home or when required to make necessary rehabilitation of a house affordable.
      2. EligibilityEligible applicants must have very low or low incomes. Adjusted income ceilings are the same as for the HUD Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher program, and are available at http://www.huduser.org/datasets/il.html or from Rural Development or HUD offices. Families must be without adequate housing; able to afford the mortgage payments, taxes and insurance, typically within 22 to 26 percent of their incomes; and unable to obtain credit elsewhere. They must have reasonable credit histories. Priority is provided to families with hardships, including those living in deficient housing; to participants in mutual self-help housing; to servicing loans; and to participation loans.
      1. TermsLoans are for terms up to 33 years (38 years for those with incomes below 60 percent of the area median and who cannot afford 33-year terms, or 30 years for manufactured homes). No down payment is required. The promissory note interest rate is set by RHS. Payment assistance subsidy is provided and is directly related to the applicant/borrower’s adjusted income as a percentage of area median income. Families without leveraged loans must pay a minimum of 22, 24, or 26 percent of their income (the percentages depend again on their income as a percent of area median) for principal, interest, taxes, and insurance (PITI) up to an amount not exceeding the promissory note rate. Families with leveraged (participation) loans are not required to meet the 22, 24, or 26 percent of adjusted income conditions.
      1. StandardsHousing built under the Section 502 program must be modest. As of March 24, 2003, a modest home is defined as one with a market value below the limit established for its state. The limit for a state can be established by a formula that takes cost into account, or it may be a limit set by the state housing finance agency or by HUD’s Federal Housing Administration for Section 203(b) loan guarantees. Check with a Rural Development office to find the limits applicable in a particular place. Houses constructed, purchased, or rehabilitated must comply with the voluntary national model building code adopted for the state as well as with RHS thermal and site standards. Manufactured housing must be permanently installed and meet the HUD Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards and RHS thermal standards.
      1. CommentsRHS is authorized to compensate Section 502 borrowers for construction defects.
      1. Variationsi) Deferred Mortgage Payment Demonstration. For very low-income applicants unable to afford payments at 1 percent for 38 years, up to 25 percent of the required payment may be deferred. This option can reduce required incomes by 10 to 20 percent. However, the program has not been re-authorized or funded since FY 1995.

        ii) Rural Housing Demonstration Program. This program finances innovative housing that does not meet existing published standards, rules, regulations, or policies, provided that the housing is not constructed contrary to law and does not present an impediment to health or safety. Ten million dollars is available annually for this purpose. RHS issues an annual Notice of Funding Availability, usually in December.

        iii) Guaranteed Homeownership Loans. The Section 502 guaranteed program is discussed in more detail below.

        iv) Conditional Commitments. For a fee of $350, which includes appraisal and inspection, builders or manufactured home contractors may receive a commitment by Rural Development to finance a given house, conditioned on sale to a qualified applicant and the availability of funds.

        v) Homeownership Loan Inventory Program. From time to time, RHS/Rural Development has homes for sale that have been acquired through liquidation of loans. These homes may be purchased with Section 502 credit. Priority is given to those eligible for the program and to applicants for the purchase of these “inventory” homes. When no eligible applicants apply, the homes are available for others. Following price reductions, the homes are again first available only to households eligible for Section 502.

      1. ApprovalRural Development local managers have authority to approve most Section 502 loans. Decisions on applications should be made within 30 to 60 days if no backlog exists.
      1. Availability of FundsAppropriated funds are apportioned for use by quarter for each fiscal year. After national and designated reserves are deducted, the balance is allocated to states by formula. RHS pools its unused money each fiscal year, usually in mid-summer. The demand for funds normally exceeds supply and RHS may choose to make all unused funds available on a first come, first served basis. Over-subscription in the program has resulted in more restricted, computerized pooling, but eligible applicants with viable applications should request processing even if a local or state office has used its initial allocation.
      1. Basic Instruction7 CFR Part 3550 subparts A, B, D and E and HB-1-3550
    1. ContactContact a Rural Development office.
  2. Homeownership Guaranteed Loan Program (Section 502 Guaranteed) (CFDA 10.410)
      1. PurposeLike direct loans, Section 502 guaranteed mortgage loans may be used to purchase, build, repair, renovate, or relocate houses, including manufactured homes; to purchase and prepare sites and/or to provide water supplies and sewage disposal for sites; and in some circumstances to refinance debts. A guaranteed loan is made by a bank or another private lender rather than by RHS/Rural Development, and RHS/Rural Development guarantees repayment if the borrower defaults.
      1. Eligibilityi) Borrower. Eligible applicants must have incomes below 115 percent of area median income. Like Section 502 direct borrowers, families must be without adequate housing; able to afford the mortgage payments, taxes and insurance; and unable to obtain credit elsewhere. They must have reasonable credit histories.

        ii) Lender. Lenders must be approved by RHS/Rural Development.

      1. TermsLoans are for terms up to 30 years. The promissory note interest rate is set by the lender. No down payment is required. Currently, the program is limited to unsubsidized loans. The subsidy, when available, provides interest assistance and is based solely on income.
      1. StandardsThis program previously used the HUD 203(b) limits to denote “modest,” but had to stop using them due to an adverse legal ruling. For this program, then, a “modest” home is one whose price the applicant/borrower can afford to pay. Like those financed by Section 502 direct loans, houses constructed, purchased, or rehabilitated with Section 502 guaranteed loans must comply with the voluntary national model building code adopted for the state as well as with RHS thermal and site standards. Manufactured housing must be permanently installed and meet the HUD Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards and RHS thermal standards.
      1. CommentsBecause of the differences in interest rate and subsidy, the guaranteed program serves a much higher income level than the direct loan program.
      1. ApprovalRural Development local managers have authority to approve most Section 502 guaranteed loans. Decisions on applications should be made within 30 to 60 days if no backlog exists.
      1. Basic Instruction7 CFR Part 1980
    1. ContactContact a Rural Development office.
  3. Very Low-Income Housing Repair Loans and Grants (Section 504) (CFDA 10.417)
      1. PurposeLoans up to $20,000 and grants up to $7,500 (loans and grants can be combined up to $27,500) are provided to very low-income homeowners to repair, improve or modernize their dwellings or to remove health and/or safety hazards, and to make dwellings accessible for household members with disabilities.
      1. Eligibilityi) Loans. Eligible homeowner-occupants must have incomes below 50 percent of area median and be unable to obtain affordable credit elsewhere. Applicants must need to make repairs and improvements to make their dwellings more safe and sanitary or to remove health and safety hazards.

        ii) Grants. Grants are available only to those homeowners 62 years of age or older who cannot repay part or all of Section 504 loans. Grant funds may be used only to pay for repairs and improvements resulting in removal of health and/or safety hazards. If a person can pay part of the cost, a combination grant and loan is made.

      1. TermsLoans are for a period of up to 20 years at 1 percent interest. A grant may be recaptured if the property is sold in less than three years.
      1. SecurityReal estate mortgages are required for loans of $7,500 or more. Full title services are required for loans of $7,500 or more.
      1. StandardsRepaired properties do not need to meet other RHS code requirements, except that installation of water and waste systems and related fixtures must meet local health department requirements. Water supply and sewage disposal systems should normally meet RHS requirements. All work must meet local codes and standards.
      1. ApprovalThe Rural Development local office should make a decision on an application within 30 to 60 days if no backlog exists.
      1. CommentsNot all the health and safety hazards in a home must be removed with Section 504 funds, provided major health and safety hazards are removed. The covering regulations provide for a liberal interpretation of the term “owner.”
    1. Basic Instruction7 CFR Part 3550 Subpart A, C, D and E and HB-1-3550

Kentucky Rural Housing USDA Guidelines

Kentucky Rural Housing and USDA Credit Score Requirements, Kentucky Rural Housing USDA Guidelines 2011, Kentucky USDA Loan Adjusted Maximum Income Limits by County, Kentucky USDA Loans, Kentucky USDA/Rural Housing Areas, no down payment, QUICK GUIDE for Kentucky USDA Rural Development Housing Loan, rhs, rhs loans kentucky, rural housing, Rural Housing Loans No Money Down Program, usda, USDA No money down mortgage Louisville Kentucky Kentucky housing corp 30 year fixedKentucky Rural Housing and USDA Credit Score Requirements, Kentucky Rural Housing USDA Guidelines , Kentucky USDA Loan Adjusted Maximum Income Limits by County, Kentucky USDA Loans, Kentucky USDA/Rural Housing Areas, no down payment, QUICK GUIDE for Kentucky USDA Rural Development Housing Loan, rhs, rhs loans kentucky, rural housing, Rural Housing Loans No Money Down Program, usda, USDA No money down mortgage Louisville Kentucky Kentucky housing corp 30 year fiThis website is not an government agency, and does
not officially represent the HUD, VA, USDA or FHA or any other government agency.

Louisville Ky Mortgage Lender FHA/VA KHC USDA Kentucky Mortgage] Kentucky USDA Refinance Funds Have Been Exhausted for Fiscal Year 2012

 Kentucky USDA Refinance Funds Have Been Exhausted for Fiscal Year 2012!
August 21, 2012
USDA Mortgage Purchase and Refinance Funding Update for Kentucky Homeowners and Buyers 
This announcement is to inform you of the current commitment authorities available for the Single Family Housing Guaranteed Loan Program (SFHGLP) loans.
Due to a change in Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 fee structure which goes into effect October 1, 2012, Lenders are urged to check with States to determine application processing time frames before underwriting applications.
 USDA Mortgage Refinance Funds:
FY (fiscal year) 2012 USDA Mortgage refinance funds have been exhausted.
We expect to run out of refinance commitment authority no later than Monday, August 20, 2012.  When USDA Mortgage refinance commitment authority is exhausted, refinance loan requests for which a conditional commitment (Form RD 1980-18) has not been issued will be returned to the lender and require underwriting under the fiscal year 2013 fee structure.  The FY 2013 fee structure will require a one-time upfront guarantee fee of 2 percent and an annual fee of 0.40 percent.  At this time, the Agency will not issue conditional commitments “subject to” receipt of FY 2013 funding or commitment authority.
USDA Mortgage Purchase Funds:
Lenders are urged to be cognizant of the differing backlogs and processing time frames from state to state.  If it is determined unrealistic that the State will be able to review the USDA loan guarantee application and issue a conditional commitment before September 30, 2012, lenders are urged to underwrite the USDA Mortgage application at the FY 2013 fee structure.  The FY 2013 guarantee fee structure will require purchase and refinance loans to carry a one-time upfront guarantee fee of 2 percent and an annual fee of 0.40 percent.
In addition, if the state where the property is located is experiencing longer processing time frames, lenders should advise the applicant accordingly when discussing interest rate locks and potential loan closing dates.
Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior  Loan Officer
Key Financial Mortgage Co. (NMLS #1800)
107 South Hurstbourne Parkway
Louisville, KY 40222

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Posted By Blogger to Louisville Ky Mortgage Lender FHA/VA KHC USDA Kentucky Mortgage at 8/28/2012

Rural Housing and USDA Loans in Kentucky

Rural Housing and USDA Loans in Kentucky

When searching for home loan options in the Kentucky , you do not want to overlook the possibility of a USDA and Rural  Home Loans . Designed to help encourage economic growth throughout the state of Kentucky, a USDA Loan is a great alternative to a traditional home loan. With no down payment required andflexible credit guidelines, a government backed USDA Loan can help your dream of homeownership become a reality in Kentucky.

  • 100% Financing Up to the Appraised Value
  • New and Existing Homes are Eligible
  • No Maximum Loan Amount
  • Low Fixed Interest Rates
  • Minimum 640 score and 3 years removed from Bankruptcy and Foreclousre
  • Maximum Income Limits Per Kentucky Household
  • Low mortgage insurance on USDA loans in Kentucky
  • Seller can pay all closing costs and prepaids
  • No Termite report or Home Inspection Needed
  • Low 30 year fixed Rates on Kentucky Home Loans

Kentucky Areas that Qualify for a USDA Loan

While USDA Loans are limited to rural areas, you will probably be surprised at the selection of qualifying areas. Rural does not have to mean farm country, and so a number of areas that that are located right next to major cities do qualify.
In general terms, eligible USDA homes are limited to areas that are not within city limits and have less than 20,000 residents. However, you should never assume that your Kentucky home does not qualify. Even if the property you are considering is close to Lexington or Louisville, it may still qualify. So seek out the guidance of the USDA Loan Agency. Fill out the Application on this page, or call one of our certified USDA loan agents at1-502=905=3708 or email kentuckyloan@gmail.com and find out if you’re eligible.

Kentucky’s USDA Loan Income Limits by County

Some of the eligibility restrictions that determine if you qualify for a USDA include the county and zip code the home resides in, as well as, your past credit history and number of dependents.

In addition, because they are designed for families with moderate to lower incomes, the income of homebuyers looking into a Kentucky USDA Home Loan cannot exceed their county’s set limit:

Kentucky USDA Loan Adjusted Maximum Income Limits by County
Updated 05/01/2009

County Name    

1-4 Person Households
(Guaranteed Loans)

5-8 Person Households 
(Guaranteed Loans)

NON-METRO

ADAIR

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

ALLEN

$73,600

$97,150

FRANKFORT, KY (MICRO)

ANDERSON

$73,600

$97,150

PADUCAH, KY-IL (MICRO)

BALLARD

$73,600

$97,150

GLASGOW, KY (MICRO)

BARREN

$73,600

$97,150

MOUNT STERLING, KY (MICRO)

BATH

$73,600

$97,150

MIDDLESBOROUGH, KY (MICRO)

BELL

$73,600

$97,150

CINCINNATI-MIDDLETOWN, OH-KY-IN (MSA)

BOONE

$73,600

$97,150

LEXINGTON-FAYETTE, KY (MSA)

BOURBON

$73,600

$97,150

HUNTINGTON-ASHLAND, WV-KY-OH (MSA)

BOYD

$73,600

$97,150

DANVILLE, KY (MICRO)

BOYLE

$73,600

$97,150

CINCINNATI-MIDDLETOWN, OH-KY-IN (MSA)

BRACKEN

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

BREATHITT

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

BRECKINRIDGE

$73,600

$97,150

LOUISVILLE-JEFFERON COUNTY, KY-IN (MSA)

BULLITT

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

BUTLER

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

CALDWELL

$73,600

$97,150

MURRAY, KY (MICRO)

CALLOWAY

$73,600

$97,150

CINCINNATI-MIDDLETOWN, OH-KY-IN (MSA)

CAMPBELL

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

CARLISLE

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

CARROLL

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

CARTER

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

CASEY

$73,600

$97,150

CLARKSVILLE, TN-KY (MSA)

CHRISTIAN

$73,600

$97,150

LEXINGTON-FAYETTE, KY (MSA)

CLARK

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

CLAY

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

CLINTON

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

CRITTENDEN

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

CUMBERLAND

$73,600

$97,150

OWENSBORO, KY (MSA)

DAVIESS

$73,600

$97,150

BOWLING GREEN, KY (MSA)

EDMONSON

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

ELLIOTT

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

ESTILL

$73,600

$97,150

LEXINGTON-FAYETTE, KY (MSA)

FAYETTE

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

FLEMING

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

FLOYD

$73,600

$97,150

FRANKFORT, KY (MICRO)

FRANKLIN

$73,600

$97,150

UNION CITY, TN-KY (MICRO)

FULTON

$73,600

$97,150

CINCINNATI-MIDDLETOWN, OH-KY-IN (MSA)

GALLATIN

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

GARRARD

$73,600

$97,150

CINCINNATI-MIDDLETOWN, OH-KY-IN (MSA)

GRANT

$73,600

$97,150

MAYFIELD, KY (MICRO)

GRAVES

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

GRAYSON

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

GREEN

$73,600

$97,150

HUNTINGTON-ASHLAND, WV-KY-OH (MSA)

GREENUP

$73,600

$97,150

OWENSBORO, KY (MSA)

HANCOCK

$73,600

$97,150

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY (MSA)

HARDIN

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

HARLAN

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

HARRISON

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

HART

$73,600

$97,150

EVANSVILLE, IN-KY (MSA)

HENDERSON

$73,600

$97,150

LOUISVILLE-JEFFERON COUNTY, KY-IN (MSA)

HENRY

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

HICKMAN

$73,600

$97,150

MADISONVILLE, KY (MICRO)

HOPKINS

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

JACKSON

$73,600

$97,150

LOUISVILLE-JEFFERON COUNTY, KY-IN (MSA)

JEFFERSON

$73,600

$97,150

LEXINGTON-FAYETTE, KY (MSA)

JESSAMINE

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

JOHNSON

$73,600

$97,150

CINCINNATI-MIDDLETOWN, OH-KY-IN (MSA)

KENTON

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

KNOTT

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

KNOX

$73,600

$97,150

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY (MSA)

LARUE

$73,600

$97,150

LONDON, KY (MICRO)

LAUREL

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

LAWRENCE

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

LEE

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

LESLIE

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

LETCHER

$73,600

$97,150

MAYSVILLE, KY (MICRO)

LEWIS

$73,600

$97,150

DANVILLE, KY (MICRO)

LINCOLN

$73,600

$97,150

PADUCAH, KY-IL (MICRO)

LIVINGSTON

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

LOGAN

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

LYON

$73,600

$97,150

RICHMOND-BEREA, KY (MICRO)

MADISON

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

MAGOFFIN

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

MARION

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

MARSHALL

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

MARTIN

$73,600

$97,150

MAYSVILLE, KY (MICRO)

MASON

$73,600

$97,150

PADUCAH, KY-IL (MICRO)

MCCRACKEN

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

MCCREARY

$73,600

$97,150

OWENSBORO, KY (MSA)

MCLEAN

$73,600

$97,150

LOUISVILLE-JEFFERON COUNTY, KY-IN (MSA)

MEADE

$73,600

$97,150

MOUNT STERLING, KY (MICRO)

MENIFEE

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

MERCER

$73,600

$97,150

GLASGOW, KY (MICRO)

METCALFE

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

MONROE

$73,600

$97,150

MOUNT STERLING, KY (MICRO)

MONTGOMERY

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

MORGAN

$73,600

$97,150

CENTRAL CITY, KY (MICRO)

MUHLENBERG

$73,600

$97,150

LOUISVILLE-JEFFERON COUNTY, KY-IN (MSA)

NELSON

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

NICHOLAS

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

OHIO

$73,600

$97,150

LOUISVILLE-JEFFERON COUNTY, KY-IN (MSA)

OLDHAM

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

OWEN

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

OWSLEY

$73,600

$97,150

CINCINNATI-MIDDLETOWN, OH-KY-IN (MSA)

PENDLETON

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

PERRY

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

PIKE

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

POWELL

$73,600

$97,150

SOMERSET, KY (MICRO)

PULASKI

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

ROBERTSON

$73,600

$97,150

RICHMOND-BEREA, KY (MICRO)

ROCKCASTLE

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

ROWAN

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

RUSSELL

$73,600

$97,150

LEXINGTON-FAYETTE, KY (MSA)

SCOTT

$73,600

$97,150

LOUISVILLE-JEFFERON COUNTY, KY-IN (MSA)

SHELBY

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

SIMPSON

$73,600

$97,150

LOUISVILLE-JEFFERON COUNTY, KY-IN (MSA)

SPENCER

$73,600

$97,150

CAMPBELLSVILLE, KY (MICRO)

TAYLOR

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

TODD

$73,600

$97,150

CLARKSVILLE, TN-KY (MSA)

TRIGG

$73,600

$97,150

LOUISVILLE-JEFFERON COUNTY, KY-IN (MSA)

TRIMBLE

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

UNION

$73,600

$97,150

BOWLING GREEN, KY (MSA)

WARREN

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

WASHINGTON

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

WAYNE

$73,600

$97,150

EVANSVILLE, IN-KY (MSA)

WEBSTER

$73,600

$97,150

CORBIN, KY (MICRO)

WHITLEY

$73,600

$97,150

NON-METRO

WOLFE

$73,600

$97,150

LEXINGTON-FAYETTE, KY (MSA)

WOODFORD

$73,600

$97,150

Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior  Loan Officer
502-905-3708 cell
502-813-2795 fax
jlobb@keyfinllc.comKey Financial Mortgage Co. (NMLS #1800)*
107 South Hurstbourne Parkway*
Louisville, KY 40222*