Tag: Business

USDA Lending Tip; Eligible Homes Locator Map

USDA Lending Tip; Eligible Homes Locator Map.

via USDA Lending Tip; Eligible Homes Locator Map.

 

Type of Mortgage Conventional Loan FHA Loans Conventional Financed MI Conventional Lender Paid MI
Purchase Price $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000
Mortgage Amount W/5% Down $285,000 $289,987 $289,547 $285,000
Interest Rate W/1.75 points 5.25% 4.50% 5.25% 5.75%
Principal Interest Payment $1,573.78 $1,469.90 $1,626.50 $1,663.11
Mortgage Insurace Payment $185.25 $118.75 Built into MTG Built into MTG
Total Mortgage Payment-P&I and Mortgage Insurance $1,759.03 $1,588.67 $1,626.50 $1,663.11
Monthly Saving Winner against all 3 read below

 

 

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Kentucky USDA RHS Rural Housing Mortgage Loans for 2013

Kentucky USDA RHS Rural Housing Mortgage Loans for 2013

Kentucky USDA Rural Program Guidelines

Borrower Eligibility
U.S. citizens
Permanent resident aliens
First time homebuyers allowed
Maximum 2 borrowers allowed
Non-occupant co-borrowers NOT allowed
Commitment Fee
USDA Rural Developmet charges a 2% Commitment Fee
Commitment Fee can be financed into the loan
Example:
Purchase price – $100,000
Loan amount – $102,040
Commitment Fee – $2,040
Maximum financed loan amount = $102,040 ($100,000 [purchase price]/.98)

This website is not an Government Agency, and does not officially represent the HUD, VA, USDA or FHA

Downpayment Requirement
No down payment is required
If borrower has adequate assets (i.e. 20% of the property purchase price) to obtain conventional financing the borrower may be ineligible for the USDA Rural Development Loan
Eligible Properties
Must be in an eligible Kentucky USDA Rural Development Location
Owner-occupied properties
Existing attached & detached single family residences
New construction with permanent financing only
PUD’s (i.e. Townhomes)
Condo-units. HUD, VA, FNMA or FHLMC approved project
Ineligible Properties
Co-ops
Mixed-use
Condotels
Manufactured homes
Log cabin homes
Single Family Homes where the Land value exceeds 30% of the appraised value AND can be sub divided.
Maximum Income Amount
County specific. Reference the USDA website for adjusted household income limits
Maximum Loan-To-Value
Maximum loan-to-value is 102%
Maximum Mortgage Amount
None
Minimum Credit Score
Middle Credit Score – 640 for each applicant for GUS automated underwriting approval
Monthly Mortgage Insurance Premium (MIP) Requirements
.40 basis points  USDA Loan require a monthly mortgage insurance premium. For example on a $100,000.00 it would be $33.33 a month
Multiple Property Ownership
Kentucky USDA Rural Development often won’t allow applicants to own other properties
Exceptions include when the other property owned is:
Not owned in the local commuting area as the new property; or
Not structurally sound and/or functionally adequate
Manufactured home not on permanent foundation

This website is not an Government Agency, and does not officially represent the HUD, VA, USDA or FHA

Occupancy Type
Owner occupied only
Qualifying Ratios
29/41% debt-to-income (DTI) – Target
Higher dti allowed on Gus Approvals or With compensating factors such as:
680 or higher credit score
No or low “payment shock” – less than a 100% increase in proposed mortgage payment Vs. current rental housing expenses
Fiscally sound use of credit
Ability to accumulate savings
Stable employment history with 2 or more in current position or continuous employment history with no job gaps
Cash reserves available for use after settlement
Career advancement as indicated by job training or additional education in the applicants profession
Trailing spouse income – as a result of a job transfer, the house is being purchased, prior to the secondary wage-earner obtaining employment. If the secondary wage-earner has an established history of employment and has a reasonable chance to obtain new employment in the area
Low total debt
Seller Contribution
Unlimited Contribution towards closing costs, prepaids, discount points, buydown fees, and upfront Commitment Fee
Transaction Types
Purchase
Rate/Term Refinance on existing USDA loan

This website is not an Government Agency, and does not officially represent the HUD, VA, USDA or FHA

Secretary Announces Refinancing Help for Rural USDA Home Loan Borrowers in Select States | The White House

Secretary Announces Refinancing Help for Rural USDA Home Loan Borrowers in Select States | The White House.

via Secretary Announces Refinancing Help for Rural USDA Home Loan Borrowers in Select States | The White House.

10 Tips for a Top Credit Score

10 Tips for a Top Credit Score.

via 10 Tips for a Top Credit Score.

Louisville Kentucky VA Refinance for Cashout, rate and term, and IRRL streamline VA refinance Mortgage

Louisville Kentucky VA Refinance for Cashout, rate and term, and IRRL streamline VA refinance Mortgage.

via Louisville Kentucky VA Refinance for Cashout, rate and term, and IRRL streamline VA refinance Mortgage.

USDA Announces Commodity Credit Corporation Lending Rates for August 2013

USDA Announces Commodity Credit Corporation Lending Rates for August 2013.

Understanding and Improving Your Credit Scores

Understanding and Improving Your Credit Scores.

via Understanding and Improving Your Credit Scores.

Kentucky USDA Loans | Rural Housing Loans Kentucky

Kentucky USDA Loans | Rural Housing Loans Kentucky.

via Kentucky USDA Loans | Rural Housing Loans Kentucky.


Joel Lobb is a Licensed Mortgage Originator: NMLS #57916. Key Financial Mortgage NMLS # 1800 is a licensed Mortgage Broker Company in the State of Kentucky 


Legal Disclaimer 



This web site is not the FHA, VA, USDA, HUD or any other government organization responsible for managing, insuring, regulating or issuing residential mortgage loans. 

**Download Fair Housing Booklet – CLICK HERE 


All approvals and rates are not guaranteed, and are only issued based on standard mortgage qualifying guidelines.

 

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Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior  Loan Officer
502-905-3708 cell
502-813-2795 fax
kentuckyloan@gmail.com

Key Financial Mortgage Co. (NMLS #1800)*
107 South Hurstbourne Parkway*

Louisville, KY 40222*

What is a Good Credit Score to qualify for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan for USDA, RHS, VA, FHA, and Fannie Mae

What is a Good Credit Score.

via What is a Good Credit Score.

What is a Good Credit Score to qualify for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan for USDA, RHS, VA, FHA, and Fannie Mae

 

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What is a Good Credit Score?

An established credit history and credit score often stands between potential home or car buyers and their dream. But What is a good credit score? What exactly is a credit score? What makes a credit score “good?” How to improve your credit score? If you’re new to building credit there are a few things you need to know in order to keep your credit looking stellar.
What is a credit score?
Your credit score is a numerical representation of your credit report. This three-digit number is like a badge that predicts risk, credit responsibility and determines your interest rates if you borrow money from lenders much like your CLUE Report. While you will be able to get a copy of your credit report you may not find this numerical key listed. Think of your credit score like the cliff notes version of your credit report. There are a few different measures of credit scores between divisions. Based on their own systems different scorers might view certain numbers in many ways.

what is a good credit score

what is a good credit score
Deciphering your three-digit credit score is quite easy if you know the levels. The range usually runs from 300-850. Good to excellent credit is considered anything from 700 to 850. If your credit score falls in this range you’re going great! Fair credit runs from 625-699, poor runs from 550-624, and anything below 550 is bad. Some finance experts would classify anything over 720 a good credit rating. Experts will disagree depending on their preferred credit rating systems, and in most cases the criteria you use to determine whether or not your credit score is good will not be far off.
What Does a Good Credit Score Mean?
Having a good credit score is great, but if you don’t know how to use it you could be missing out on some crucial credit building. Credit scores are used in varying ways by lenders and banks. One thing your credit score implies is how likely you are to pay back debt. Basically it announces how reliable you are as a borrower. People with good credit scores are more likely to pay back funds that they borrow while those with lower scores aren’t so reliable. Lenders like reliable borrowers, and good credit points them out.
But a credit score does much more than predict whether or not you’ll pay a loan back. When it comes to buying a house or car, there is an interest charge. Higher credit scores usually have a lower interest rate than those with bad to fair credit. Lenders not only base whether or not they’ll approve a loan by your credit score, but also how much interest to charge. If your credit is in good standing your interest rate won’t be as high as someone with bad credit. Your credit score saves you money with lower interest rates.
How is a Credit Score Calculated?
In order to build and maintain good credit you must first know how your score is determined. Once you know what goes into a credit score you can begin building your credit or nursing your score towards higher digits. Credit scores are based on your financial history only, and laws prevent your score being affected by things like race, gender, age and where you live. What is included are items such as your payment history, your current credit debts, age of your credit history, new credit items added to your accounts and types of credit used.
These five basic areas are where the bulk of your credit score is formed. All criteria have varying degrees of involvement in your score. For example:
  • Payment history (35%) – How many on-time payments you’ve made, missed, defaulted and past due items
  • Current amount owed (30%) – How much you currently owe – if you owe a large amount this could negatively affect your score
  • Age of credit history (15%) – The average length of your credit accounts and time since last activity
  • New credit (10%) – The number of new credit items on your accounts
  • Types of credit (10%) – The kinds of credit accounts are you currently maintain
How to Improve Your Credit Score?
Many people avoid credit based on all the negatives they’ve heard against it, but neglecting your credit score hurts your chances of being able to make major purchases in the future. The best way to build credit is to use credit, and forming the following good credit habits early will pull your low score to higher ground.
  • Pay bills on time – This is the easiest and best way to boost your credit score. Since the bulk of your credit score comes from your payment history, paying bills on time will pull you up quickly. Not only will that help, but a recent and consistent history of paying bills on time overshadow a period long in the past where you may have missed payments.
  • Budget – Setting up a budget and staying within its parameters will keep you from overspending and using credit for frivolous things. Although using credit builds credit not being able to pay it off hurts more in the future.
  • Use all your credit cards regularly – If you have a few credit cards try to use them from time to time in order to show that you use all of your accounts. Remember that the last usage of an account is 15% of your score.
If you want to start repairing a bad credit history or start building yours, find out what your credit score is. I use Credit Karma to check mine, you can check out my review of Credit Karma or if want just apply here –www.creditkarma.com.
Making your way to a good credit score and keeping your score high won’t be a financial nightmare when you know how to build it and what it means financially.


Posted By Blogger to Louisville Ky Mortgage Lender FHA/VA

Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior  Loan Officer

Kentucky Single Family Housing USDA RHS Guaranteed Loan Program Update 2011

Kentucky Single Family Housing USDA RHS Guaranteed Loan Program Update 2011.

via Kentucky Single Family Housing USDA RHS Guaranteed Loan Program Update 2011.